To cope with information overload, people look for signals of credibility and relevance. We’re developing a Quality Mark to signal that public legal information is trustworthy and relevant.

Research shows that to cope with information overload, people take shortcuts. They will attempt to lessen their cognitive load by ignoring some information and looking for signals of credibility and relevance.

We’ve studied the signals and shortcuts people use when looking for legal information. We learned, for example, that people put great value in knowing the source of information. They look for signals the information has been reviewed by an expert — someone who knows the law. And for signs the information is current.

We’ve distilled these learnings into a set of public legal information best practices. The Quality Mark can be used on information that substantially follows the best practices. Using the Quality Mark on information can signal that it is trustworthy and relevant for the public.

We plan to launch the Quality Mark in early 2020. If you’re interested in having us contact you when it’s ready, let us know.

A number of organizations in British Columbia that produce and support public legal information have collaborated to develop the Quality Mark.

Once the Quality Mark is launched in 2020, you will need to do three things to use the mark on your information:

  1. Produce public legal information. You must produce public legal information — information about the law or justice system, primarily intended for use by the public.
  2. Commit to applying the public legal information best practices. You must commit to applying the public legal information best practices to your information to the best of your ability.
  3. Complete the best practices self-assessment, and achieve a minimum score. You must score at least 12 points out of a possible 16 points on the best practices self-assessment.

Yes, as long as the website is substantially one that features public legal information, and the information achieves the minimum score required on the best practices self-assessment. “Substantially” means more than half of the website must be public legal information. “Public” means the information is primarily intended for use by the public.

Yes, you will be able to decide what web pages to use the Quality Mark on — as long as they are substantially similar to the one you self-assessed.

Yes. The Quality Mark is intended for use on public legal information in any format, as long as the information achieves the minimum score required on the best practices self-assessment.

The Quality Mark can be used to promote any public legal information that has achieved the minimum score required on the best practices self-assessment.

Quality Mark

See if you qualify

The Quality Mark (once it's available in 2020) can be used on information that substantially follows our best practices.
Go to Self-Assess